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HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS IN SCHOOLS

Home >> Resources for Schools >> Schools Chemical List


Page of 99 | 985 records |
Chemical NamePhysical
Hazard
Health
Hazard
Environ-
mental
Hazard
Lowest Grade AllowedStorage CategoryExperiments Where UsedDisposal
Method
Abscisic Acid -- Causes serious eye irritation
Causes skin irritation
May cause respiratory irritation
-- Elementary demos only O-1 Botany - effects of plant hormones Dispose as solid waste
Acetal Highly flammable liquid and vapour
May form explosive peroxides
Causes serious eye irritation
Causes skin irritation
-- Ban Candidate O-3 Flam Cabinet NONE Dispose as hazardous waste
Acetaldehyde Extremely flammable liquid and vapour
May form explosive peroxides
Causes serious eye irritation
May cause respiratory irritation
Suspected of causing cancer
-- Ban Candidate O-3 Flam Cabinet NONE. Formerly used as: Organic substrate in organic reactions. Highly reactive chemical - assessment required before disposal
Acetamide -- Suspected of causing cancer -- Middle School O-2 Melting points. Heat of fusion (enthalpy) experiments. Dispose as hazardous waste
Acetanilide -- Harmful if swallowed -- High School O-2 Organic substrate used in organic reactions. Dispose as hazardous waste
Acetic Acid (<1 Molar) -- Causes serious eye irritation
Causes skin irritation
-- All grades Misc Volcano experiment (tame version). Neutralizing base spills. Dispose as hazardous waste - Neutralization option available
Acetic Acid (>6 Molar) Flammable liquid and vapour Causes severe skin burns and eye damage -- High School O-1 Flam Cabinet Ester lab. Scent lab. Plant mitosis microscopy staining. Stock acid solution. Dispose as hazardous waste
Acetic Acid (1 Molar to 6 Molar) -- Causes serious eye irritation
Causes skin irritation
-- Middle School O-1 Stoichiometry. Mole ratio. Dispose as hazardous waste - Neutralization option available
Acetic Anhydride Flammable liquid and vapour Causes severe skin burns and eye damage
Harmful if inhaled
Harmful if swallowed
-- High school w/ chemical hygiene officer approval O-1 Flam Cabinet Compounding of aspirin. Organic substrate. Thermochemistry. Restricted to advanced placement science. Dispose as hazardous waste
Aceto Carmine Flammable liquid and vapour Causes severe skin burns and eye damage -- Middle School O-9 Plant mitosis microscopy staining. Cell and bacteria stain. Dispose as hazardous waste
Page of 99 | 985 records |
  Help & FAQs ...  
How’d you choose these chemicals?
Over 98% of the chemicals on the list have been seen in secondary schools in Washington State during both the King County and Washington State Rehab the Lab Projects. The others were listed as chemicals of concern in schools by the American Chemical Society.
Related topic helpful link...  membership.acs.org/C/CCS/pubs/NotInSecondarySchools.pdf
What’s “Hazard Rank”?
Hazard rank is a short-hand quick assessment of comparative hazards. 0 is very low hazard and relatively safe for students to handle. 5 is extremely hazardous (physically &/or toxicologically) AND has little-to-no educational utility in primary or secondary schools.
What’s “Minimum Grade Level Restrictions” mean?
This is our attempt to provide recommendations for the minimum grade level curriculum that should use these chemicals. The rating is based on three factors: 1) the chemical’s comparative hazards, 2) if the chemical is sold by one of the three major chemical supply companies for schools (Flinn Scientific, Carolina Biological Supply or Sargent Welch), and 3) the frequency of use in experiments in specific grade-level chemistry. For instance, Acetic Anhydride is used in the manufacture of aspirin in Advanced Placement organic chemistry (AP Chem). AP Chem is college-credited curriculum taught to high school students.
What’s “Storage Category”?
If you click on the word “storage category” in the database, it will sort it alphabetically. What you’ll see is that chemicals with the same storage category share the same hazardous characteristics. It’s a system designed to keep incompatible chemicals away from each other. Categories preceded by the letter “O” are organic compounds, those with an “I” are inorganic.
Related topic helpful link...  www.lbl.gov/ehs/chsp/html/storage.shtml
Who’s the intended audience for the School Chemicals Database?
The intended audience is public and private primary & secondary school science teachers, risk managers and purchasing agents. However, the database is also a very useful tool for public health, safety and health, and environmental inspectors visiting any kind of laboratory. It is also useful for people wishing to know the hazards of one of the ingredients of a commercially available product.
Ban Candidate
Compounds that have little to no educational usefulness in secondary schools, are very hazardous via skin contact, inhalation or through physical effects (fire, explosion, corrosion, etc.) These chemicals are not commercially available from the usual chemical suppliers for secondary schools. Ban Candidates include all mercury compounds and elemental mercury, which are prohibited to be stored, purchased or used in Washington State schools under the Revised Codes of Washington State (Chapter 70.95M RCW).
Chemical Name
Chemical name of the material as seen in listings from chemical supply companies such as Flinn Scientific, Carolina Biological Supply, and JT Baker. Also includes common synonyms and synonyms from older naming protocols.
Clarifying details on concentration or form
Notes on common names, components of a mixture, solution strength etc.
Experiments - Processes Where Used
A listing of experiments that make use of the named compound. Most of the data was provided by Doug Mandt, retired science teacher and long time safety committee chairperson for the Washington Science Teacher's Asssociation. Stain data provided by http://101science.com/Stains.html. Other info provided by Small Scale Chemistry Institute, Flinn Scientific Catalog, teachers from Northshore, Lake Washington school districts in particular and many other science teachers during lab inspections.
Frequency of purchase & use per Flinn
Flinn Scientific is a major supplier of school chemicals and includes in its catalog a ranking of how commonly chemicals are sold to schools. We used this ranking to help us determine how useful certain chemicals are in schools.
Hazard Rank
Hazard rank is a short-hand quick assessment of comparative hazards. 0 is very low hazard and relatively safe for students to handle. 5 is extremely hazardous (physically &/or toxicologically) AND has little-to-no educational utility in primary or secondary schools.
Minimum grade level & defined restrictions
Grade level below which use of this chemical in the classroom is not recommended. Defined restrictions are primarily based on input from Doug Mandt of the Washington Science Teacher's Association, input and discussions with science teachers from the Lake Washington, Northshore, Seattle, Renton and Bellevue school districts.These recommended restrictions incorporate the usefulness of the compound, based on availability from suppliers, and its hazards. Chemicals with significant hazards that can be easily taken up via inhalation or skin contact are restricted to higher grade levels or recommended for banning.
Molar (<1M, 1-6M, >6M)
The molar concentration of a solution, usually expressed as the number of moles of solute per liter of solution. The ranges listed are those commonly found for acids and bases in secondary schools. Solutions with concentrations over 6.0 Molar are considered concentrated. Those below 1.0 molar are considered very dilute. 0.1 molar solutions are commonly used in Small Scale Chemistry lab exercises.
Recommended disposal method
Appropriate treatment and disposal methods for quantities of these chemicals typically generated by secondary school chemistry laboratories. These disposal methods are acceptable in King County, Washington, based on the regulations in King County and the state of Washington. Disposal regulations may be more or less restrictive in other areas. Contact your local hazardous waste representative and sewer utility to verify disposal methods in your region. If you are in another state, a good online resource to understand your chemical waste treatment options can be found at this EPA website http://www.epa.gov/sbo/pdfs/hazwaste_500.pdf
SDS
Safety Data Sheet. Schools are required to have an SDS for any chemical or product they use. Manufacturers and Suppliers are required to supply SDSs when they are requested. SDSs contain information about a compound's physical characteristics, hazards, personal protection requirements and spill clean up information. SDSs are also available on-line. For "pure" chemical compounds,visit Sigma-Aldrich.com's MSDS page and search for the chemical name.
Related topic helpful link...  www.sigmaaldrich.com/safety-center.html
Sold by Sargent Welch to Schools?
Sargent Welch is a major supplier of school chemicals. Noted here if sold in their on-line catalog.
Storage Category
The designation for a compatible chemical storage system based on chemical families described in the book Prudent Practices in the Laboratory (National Research Council). This system is compatible with the one recommended by Flinn Scientific Inc. and JT Baker which allows for chemicals to be safely stored. If you click on the word “storage category” in the database, the chemical list will sort by storage category alphabetically. What you’ll see is that chemicals with the same storage category share the same hazardous characteristics. It’s a system designed to keep incompatible chemicals away from each other. Categories preceded by the letter “O” are organic compounds, those with an “I” are inorganic. GO HERE (hyperlink) for details of a compatible storage system for very small storage spaces.